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Makers movement with 3D Printing

An important current trend is the Makers Movement. When applied to healthcare, patients can hack their illnesses with simple modifications and brainstorming. Patients are making a difference by driving solutions in their own care, on an individual case-by-case basis.

A cornerstone of the Makers Movement is 3D printing, also called additive manufacturing, one of the most disruptive technologies across every industry and economy in the world. Its applications in healthcare are tremendous and game-changing specifically when used in places of insufficient medical supply. Widespread access to and knowledge about 3D printing is going to take the patient makers movement to a whole new level.

The explosive growth of 3D printing means that you can personalize and individualize literally every single thing in your life to your exact specifications — color, design, size. This is a huge difference from making one-size-fits-all. Anything that goes on or in the body will be printed to fit you 100 percent. Just about anything that was previously made of plastic or metal can now easily be printed in 3D.

3D printing would be able to furnish hospital with on-demand supplies and equipment. In areas with unstable supply lines or in remote locations, 3D printing will mean the difference between being able to access some supplies, or having nothing at all. For example,In Tanzania, a makers workshop Sticlab has managed to 3D print a microscope that is cost effective and reliable to inidividuals of all calibers. The microscope could be used in rural places where access to daily medical deliveries is a huge issue. It’s difficult to get enough medical supplies to places like Mzaganza and 3D printing provided an immediate solution, with accurate results.

Widespread access to and knowledge about 3D printing is going to take the patient Maker Movement to a whole new level. It is expected to see rapid progress, now that patients suddenly have easy access to new tools to create solutions that can make a major impact, especially in daily routines.

Traditional medicine isn’t deeply personalized, but the Maker Movement is making it possible for patients to individualize their treatments, share their work and ideas in communities, collaborate together and innovate further.

Health and 3D printing hackathon has been organized to take place in Tanzania on 14th February 2017 at Buni Hub with one core purpose. TO drive more people and raise awareness on the use of 3D printing in saving lives.

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